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In a world, where free content reigns king, where sites like Youtube, Google, and the e-learning sites proclaim professional level content for free… content is now a worthless commodity.

... the king is dead.  Long live the king.

Think about even your own experience - you're unlikely to pay to read a blog - even the news sites struggle to charge readers - let alone people who actually TEACH something.

Everyone’s got their own content, their own online course, containing their own tepid spin on something they learned from long forgotten course that they now teach.

For the true master, you could be forgiven for thinking it’s becoming more and more difficult to stand out from the hobbyists and wannabe’s who launch their own $200 “premium” course.

Thing is though, nobody really cares about your content.  Anyone can rapidly get information about any subject, in the seconds it takes to do a google search.

  • How to do Facebook Ads? Check.
  • Run an online course? Check.
  • Build a website with no skills at all! Check.
  • Write a best selling book in X hours and get credibility? Check.
  • Build a 7 figure online course with ease? Check.  (Aka lol).
  • Fix your golf swing? Check.

If Content Is Free, What Are People Buying?

So, if content is effectively free.  If educational content is a commodity that’s available for FREE, what ARE people paying for?

The people who are the most successful in educational spaces right now KNOW that it’s not about content.

  • That’s WHY there’s retreats.
  • That’s WHY there’s masterclasses.
  • That’s WHY there’s masterminds.

All of those things are so NOT about content.  And if YOUR retreat, masterclass or mastermind is primarily about content… you’re screwed.

What Do Other Industries Do?

Let’s look at another industry for inspiration - aviation.

All the major airlines spend big bucks on real life jet simulators, so they can put all their pilots in there, NUMEROUS times a year.  Do you think they just get them to fly a standard Melbourne To Sydney and call it a day…. not on your life.

They pop them in the simulator, then they mess with them to see how they will respond.

  •  They put the engines on fire.
  • They break computer systems.
  • They ice up the controls.
  • They simulate cabin decompression.

It's About Putting Them Under The Pump

In summary: they put the pilots into the pressure cooker.

They put them into an unfamiliar CONTEXT to see how they respond - and when they fail, give them the insight to do better next time.  They gain experience by doing this over and over.

Because you better believe they taught the pilots the THEORY of what to do.  That’s the content. You better believe they spend hours learning the theory.

So why do they spend the big bucks on the simulator?

  • Theory means nothing if they crumble under pressure.
  • If they can’t solve problems in the air.
  • If they can’t figure things out that they haven’t been specifically trained for.

That's What They Pay For

THAT, is why they do it.  THAT is why they lay out the big bucks.  Because someone who can keep their calm under pressure, when the CONTEXT of the situation changes

So what’s the airline simulator in your business?  How do you teach your clients how to respond to varying contexts.

 

This is the key to selling high ticket education.

Everyone selling high ticket who is STILL selling high ticket after 2 years is a MASTER at this.

For these guys, a $2,000 multi-day event is CHEAP.

Context.  People Pay For Context.

They teach content, sure.  But what they REALLY help students with is understanding CONTEXT... so what's the difference?

 

When you teach content, you're focussed on the knowledge, you're focussed on the information.  It's about the transfer of the knowledge.

When you teach context, you're focussed on behaviour, on the environment and how people reacted to it - you're focused on on the actions people took at the time - and why.

When you teach content, the focus is on the teacher.  They are the centre of attention.  The teacher has the knowledge and provides answers.

When you teach context, the focus is on the student.  The student has the answers, the teacher has the insight & provides questions.

Content based learning is information focussed.  You teach information.

Context based learning is environment focussed.  You facilitate the environment and debrief  actions.

 

When it comes to teaching - people will pay far more for experience and contextual learning than they will for content.

You need to be able to develop a systemised approach to delivering contextual breakthroughs with your clients.

To help them identify how they are behaving, so they can improve and grow - which is REALLY what they are paying you for.

The next move, is up to you.  Want to build your own pressure cooker simulator for your clients?  Reach out and let me know.